Which Meat Free Week are you after ?

In the coming years, we hope to bring Meat Free Week to more countries. By supporting either Australia or the UK, you’re helping us along that journey

Too much processed meat increases the risk of bowel cancer - Australia's 2nd biggest cancer killer. Are you at risk?
Leading world scientists warn of water shortages for food production by 2050. It takes 3,900 litres to produce 1kg of chicken and just 1,300 litres of water to produce 1kg of wheat.
90% of bacon, ham and pork we eat has come from factory farms. Will you choose free range?
More Australians are supporting sustainable and ethical farming practices. Are you one of them?
Australian's eat over half a billion chickens a year. Most are factory farmed. Where does yours come from?
Australian's eat almost three times meat as the world average and double recommended dietary guidelines. How much are you eating?
At a time when some 800 million people suffer from malnutrition, one third of the world's harvest is fed to farm animals. Enough to feed almost three billion people.
Nearly all of the world's fishing zones have exceeded their natural limits because of overfishing. Yet, one third of all fish caught is fed directly to livestock. Does that make sense to you?
Floradix is a liquid iron herbal supplement that is suitable for the whole family; and especially good for pregnancy. It’s easy to drink and the natural fruit juice makes it taste great. Available in all good health stores, and select Coles stores.
Almost 92% of Australians are not eating enough vegetables. What's on your plate?
Did you know 70% of smallgoods (ham, salami, pepperoni etc) sold in Australia are made with imported pork, increasing your risk of antibiotic resistance.
“By participating in Meat free week you can do your bit to bring about some positive change.” Simon Bryant
The U.N. has identified the livestock industry as one of the most significant contributors to today's most serious environmental problems.
Why is Meat Free Week only one week? Because we didn't think you'd make it through a month!

RECIPES

By Martyna Angell
By Martyna Angell
By Bill Granger
By Valli Little
By Bill Granger
By Valli Little
By Cherie Hausler
By Katrina Woodman
By Michelle Southan
By Simon Bryant
By Matt Wilkinson
By Katrina Woodman
By Mindy Woods
By Belinda Jeffery
By Simon Bryant
By Dan Churchill
By Adam & Lovaine Humphrey
By Renae Smith
By Mindy Woods
By Cherie Hausler
By Simon Bryant
By Simon Bryant
By Simon Bryant
By Simon Bryant
By Cherie Hausler
By Katrina Woodman
By taste.com.au
By Matt Wilkinson
By Cherie Hausler
By Emma Braz
By Mindy Woods
By Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall
By Bill Granger
By Dan Churchill
By taste.com.au
By Emma Braz
By Rowie Dillon
By Valli Little
By Melissa Paddison
By Liz Macri
By Valli Little
By Martyna Angell
By Melissa Paddison
By Michelle Southan
By Martyna Angell
By Simon Bryant
By Cherie Hausler
By taste.com.au
By Cherie Hausler
By taste.com.au
By Katie Quinn Davies
By Belinda Jeffery
By Belinda Jeffery
By Mindy Woods
By Martyna Angell
By Mindy Woods
By Chissy Freer
By Bill Granger
By Cherie Hausler
By Adam & Lovaine Humphrey
By Valli Little
By Belinda Jeffery
By Bill Granger
By Bill Granger
By Adam & Lovaine Humphrey
By Dan Churchill
By Chissy Freer
By Rowie Dillon
By Melissa Paddison
By taste.com.au
By Sonja Bernyk
By Michelle Noerianto
By Renae Smith
By Valli Little
By Melissa Paddison
By taste.com.au
Planning is key

It’s a great idea to plan your meals for the seven days before Meat Free Week commences. It will make it so much easier (and more fun) to stick to your resolve. Our wonderful chefs & foodies have helped make it easy with their nutritious and delicious vegetarian meals.

Like most things in life, the greatest success comes from good planning. Think about when you’ll most miss meat and replace it with one of the fabulous recipes on this page.

Don’t forget that it’s important to eat protein with every meal, to fill you up and ensure you have long-lasting energy. You can access protein from non-meat sources such as legumes, beans, tofu, tempeh and the like.

For more on nutrition, see below.

Nutrition

+ Protein has lots of important functions and is essential for growth and maintenance. Sources include nuts, nut butters, peas, beans and soy products (tofu, tempeh, veggie burgers). Milk products and eggs are also good protein sources (remember free range and organic only).

+ Iron is an essential mineral which carries oxygen from our lungs throughout the body. Sources include iron-fortified breakfast cereals, spinach, kidney beans, whole wheat breads, lentils, some dried fruits (dried apricots, prunes, raisins) and peas.

+ Calcium build bones mass and is needed for good teeth and strong bones. Sources include orange juice, calcium-fortified breakfast cereals, calcium-fortified soymilk, and some dark-green leafy vegetables (bok choy is our favourite!).

+ Zinc is vital for keeping the immune system strong. Sources include many types of beans (white beans, kidney beans and chickpeas), zinc-fortified breakfast cereals, wheat germ and pumpkin seeds.

 

Concerned about iron?

Some of the symptoms of iron deficiency are:

+ Fatigue and general lack of energy

+ Decreased ability to concentrate

+ Decreased endurance during exercise

+ Increased frequency of infection

+ Ridges along the fingernails

+ Paleness and/or dark circles under the eyes 

Are You Low In Iron?

Iron is one of the most commonly deficient nutrients in our diets, affecting as any 40% of the world's population, according to the World Health Organisation.

The recommended daily intake of iron for women lies between 14 and 20 mg and while we can get some of the iron we need from food, the average consumption of dietary iron is only 6 mg per 1000 calories.

However when a women becomes pregnant, her need for iron increases up to 27 mg per day, which can be very difficult to extract from diet alone.

This means that the majority of women are not getting enough dietary iron and may experience positive benefits by taking Floradix a unique liquid supplement, which may be effective in bringing iron stores back to normal. 

Floradix: A Quality Iron Supplement

Floradix is a unique, liquid supplement that has been formulated to be an excellent source of iron without the risk of excess iron storage.

Floradix contains organic iron (II) from ferrous gluconate, vitamins B2, B6, B12 and C which contribute to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue and to normal energy-yielding metabolism. In addition, iron contributes to normal red blood cell formation, supported by vitamins B6 and B12, and haemoglobin formation.

Keep Energy Levels Up By Boosting Your Iron Intake

Iron is needed to make haemoglobin, the chemical that transports oxygen in the blood. A range of stressful symptoms can indicate a deficiency, but severe cases can lead to anaemia, total exhaustion and a weakened immune system.

A healthy, balanced diet with iron-rich foods will provide most of the iron you need during pregnancy. This should include lean meats; pulses such as peas, beans and lentils; fruits such as prunes, apricots and raisins; and dark green leafy vegetables such as spinach. This is where Floradix can really help.

We recommend that if you are pregnant, nursing, have a medical condition or are currently taking medication that you seek advice from a health professional before you take any dietary supplement. Always read the product directions before use and do not exceed the recommended intake.

 

Myth Busters

There are so many myths out there that try to convince you to eat more meat. We thought we’d bust some of them for you:

MYTH: Without red meat, you will be lacking in iron
FACT: You can source iron easily from dried beans and dark leafy vegetables, which actually are better sources on a per calorie basis than meat. Cashew nuts and prune juice are also rich sources.

MYTH: Meat is the best source of protein in your diet
FACT: You can easily find low fat protein options in nuts and seeds, as well as legumes like beans and lentils.

MYTH: The fatty acids in red meat can help avoid heart disease
FACT: Excess consumption of red meat has been directly linked to heart disease. While fish is a good source of fatty acids, the mercury and other toxins found in the flesh of marine food sources far outweigh the benefits of the EFAs. Furthermore, grains and seeds like Flax, Chia and Pumpkin seeds have far more EFAs per weight than any animal source. As for B Group vitamins, you can source them readily from seaweed, for example Nori.

MYTH: I can’t be healthy if I don’t eat meat
FACT: Meat is high in saturated fats and it tips our state of neutral pH to acidic, which my constrict blood vessels, clog arteries and stiffen joints. Excess meat intake increases our risk of bowel cancer, heart disease, arthritis and osteoporosis. Meat is also hard to digest, so increases the frequency of illness due to gut-related problems.

Not only that, by eating less meat, you can expect to enjoy possible weight loss and lowered risk of obesity, improvement in your overall health due to lowered saturated fats and toxin exposure, and an alkaline state in the body which allows all systems to function optimally.

So there you have it! More good reasons to consider reducing the amount of meat you eat.